Taking things Slow

Dear neglected readers,

I swore early on in the summer that I was going to become a better blogger, and here it is October and I’ve been slacking. Believe me when I say I have a good excuse or two: 1) I’ve been traveling pretty much nonstop the past few months, and 2) I’ve been busy planning a wedding for next weekend (!). I have some amazing travel photos & stories to catch up on posting, so please take things slow with me!

Speaking of slow (har har), I wanted to post a few photos from a talk I gave on a perfect Saturday afternoon last month to Chicago’s Slow Food chapter. The org was honoring its volunteers and its partnership with the Peterson Garden Project (which is awesome) with a little garden cocktail party, & I was tapped to talk about my favorite spirit, as it’s super amenable to garden ingredients. I decided to focus on the South Side Cocktail, & a recipe follows down below.

I was quite charmed by the Peterson Garden Project space, as you can see…

garden

I love the garden tools painted on the shed

garden-alt

a combination of flat beds and stepping-stair planters lines the north fence

planters

love this simple stepping-stair planter made from 2x4s

votives

super-cute votive display repurposed from a tomato cage

peppers

peppers as bright as that green composting bin

My bartender-friend Carlos assisted with a delicious round of Southside Cocktails made with FEW Navy Strength gin (whew!). This is the recipe we followed.

Southside Cocktail
Note: To make a Southside Fizz, follow the below recipe except strain into collins glass filled iwth ice, then top with soda & garnish.
2 ounces gin (we used FEW Standard Issue Navy Strength, which was generously donated)
3/4 ounce fresh lime juice
3/4 ounce simple syrup
1 bunch of mint for muddling, sans stems
1 bunch mint for garnish, fresh from Peterson Garden!

1. In a cocktail shaker, very gently muddle mint leaves.
2. Add gin, lime juice, simple syrup and ice.
3. Seal shaker and shake hard, to blend fruit juice.
4. Strain into cocktail glass and garnish with one or two mint leaves.